Black Lies Matter PT.9 “Blue Klux Klan” 1

While enjoying a deep conversation with a man that I have a lot of respect for our chat took a turn.

Not because we were going into different directions but quite the opposite.

We were dealing with one of the toughest subjects of the 21st century for the children of Africa, Misidentified as former slaves.

When I say former slaves, what is the first things that come to mind also what would I or we be dealing with that is unique or different from what anyone else is dealing with in America?

Or what are Black People whining about now?

This is a conclusion that many people jump when a Person Of African decent proclaims or complains about the the blind justice of greatest country in the world.

And who do you think that you are ( Black Person) Negro,Jigaboo,Coon or Nig…

As I am writing this blog, the city of Chicago is in the midst of a scandal about a young Black man and a grandmother that were gunned down by a White police officer.

This is not an isolated story but has become what has been referred to as “The New Normal”

Screengrab/CBS

CHICAGO — Bettie Jones, known in her Chicago neighborhood for her work with anti-violence community groups, was killed by police officers responding to a domestic disturbance just hours after she hosted family on Christmas Day.

The fatal shooting of Jones, 55, and 19-year-old Quintonio LeGrier, a college student visiting his father for the holiday, at a West Side home has raised further questions about a police department already under intense scrutiny. Grieving relatives and friends of the pair gathered Sunday to remember them and criticize city officials who they said had once again failed residents.

The shooting happened early Saturday morning at the small two-story home, where Jones lived in a ground-floor apartment and LeGrier’s father in an upstairs unit. The police, who were responding to a 911 call made by LeGrier’s father after an argument with his son, have released few details beyond a brief statement.

It said officers “were confronted by a combative subject resulting in the discharging of the officer’s weapon” and added that Jones “was accidentally struck.”

Both Jones and LeGrief were black, and their deaths come amid scrutiny of the police after a series of deaths of African-Americans at the hands of officers across the country gave rise to the Black Lives Matter movement.

http://www.businessinsider.com

What we will also talk about is the fact that those shots were taken from 20 feet away (Fact)

There’s more:

It also comes amid a federal civil-rights investigation into the Chicago Police Department was launched after last month’s release of police dashcam video showing a white officer, Jason Van Dyke, shooting a black 17-year-old, Laquan McDonald, 16 times in 2014.

The police did not disclose the race of the officer or officers, saying only that those involved would be placed on administrative duties.

LeGrier’s mother, Janet Cooksey, during a vigil Sunday placed candles on the porch of the home. On either side of the door, Post-It notes indicated where two bullets hit siding on the house.

“I used to watch the news daily and I would grieve for other mothers, other family members, and now today I’m grieving myself,” Cooksey said at a news conference outside the residence earlier Sunday.

Others who spoke said the police should have used stun guns or other nonlethal methods if they felt they needed to subdue LeGrier.

“Why do (police) have to shoot first and ask questions later?” Jacqueline Walker, a friend of Jones, said. “It’s ridiculous.”

More:

Thomson Reuters

Family spokesman Eric Russell said Jones’ many grandchildren had hoped to thank her for their Christmas gifts over the weekend.

Autopsy findings released Sunday by the Cook County medical examiner’s office say Jones died from a gunshot to the chest and LeGrier from multiple gunshot wounds.

Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi on Sunday said only that the shootings were being investigated by the city’s Independent Police Review Authority, the main police oversight agency.

LeGrier’s cousin, Albert Person, said LeGrier’s father had invited his son to a holiday gathering at another home on Christmas. Person said the son’s refusal to go caused friction, but he downplayed the severity of the argument.

“What family doesn’t fight on the holidays?” he said.

LeGrier’s father, Antonio LeGrier, told the Chicago Sun-Times his son appeared to be a “little agitated” when the father returned to the apartment. Around 4:15 a.m., the elder LeGrier said he heard loud banging on his locked bedroom door and that his son said, “You’re not going to scare me.” He said his son tried to bust the door open, but he kept him from doing so and called the police. He added that he called Jones on the floor below to say his son was a “little irate” and not to open the door unless the police arrived.

Finally:

He said Jones told him his son was outside with a baseball bat. Person said the teen was back in the house by the time the police arrived.

When they did arrive, Antonio LeGrier said he heard Jones yell, “Whoa, whoa, whoa!” He said he heard gunshots as he made his way down from the second floor and then saw his son and Jones lying in the foyer.

He said his son had emotional problems after spending most of his childhood in foster care. He described him as a “whiz kid” on break from Northern Illinois University, where he majored in electrical engineering technology.

Cooksey denied that her son ever exhibited “combative behavior.” She said he “might’ve been angry with his father and they might’ve got into it,” but that he was not angry or violent.

It’s not clear whether Jones tried to intervene before being shot or whether she was hit by gunfire while answering the door.

Uh Oh: Say What?

y Images

Sam Adam Jr., a lawyer for the Jones family, said Jones and LeGrier were apparently shot near the doorway of the home but shell casings were found some 20 feet away. He said that raised questions about whether the police could have perceived LeGrier as a threat at such a distance.

It couldn’t be independently verified that the casings had any link to Saturday’s shooting.

Adam also said the police took the hard drive of a home-security camera from across the street, but it was unknown whether it or other cameras in the neighborhood captured the shootings.

The office of Chicago’s mayor, Rahm Emanuel, said in a statement Saturday that IPRA would share its evidence with the county prosecutor’s office.

“Any time an officer uses force the public deserves answers, and regardless of the circumstances, we all grieve anytime there is a loss of life in our city,” Emanuel said in the statement.

IPRA : Independent Police Review Authority is a group of people that have the responsibility to look at Police involved shooting and evaluate whether or not it was justified.

They also offer recommend that if in some cases an officer should be reprimanded or even terminated.

There are a lot of people involved with this increased number of shootings of unarmed Black men however, we must take a look at other common themes in these types of shootings.

They feared for their lives ( Even though they are the one’s with training and go into dangerous situations)

They are the only one with a weapon.

In most cases they (The Officers) is using a lot of profanity and are rarely alone.

But what if the Black man isn’t a man at all and based on the constitution “Not Even Human”

Ebony Slaughter-Johnson published

Still Treated as Second-Class Citizens By the Law

The infamous Dred Scott Supreme Court ruling once denied African Americans any and all rights as human beings. Has anything changed?

July 13, 2016 | Ebony Slaughter-Johnson

She Continued

When I heard about the police shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, I thought back to another name etched into American history: Dred Scott.

In 1857, the Supreme Court was tasked with deciding whether Scott, an African American man born into slavery, should be granted his freedom. The justices not only denied Scott’s request, but also took the opportunity to send a chilling message to all African Americans, free and enslaved, that reverberates to this day.

The court held that as members of an inferior race, African Americans were not citizens at all — and, as such, did not even have legal standing to sue. African Americans, as Chief Justice Roger Taney so decisively determined, had “no rights which the white man was bound to respect.”

The next century was characterized by an ongoing struggle to prove Taney wrong.

African American heroism during the Civil War era hastened the passage of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments, which ended slavery and (theoretically) reversed race-based restrictions on citizenship. Yet these gains were negated almost as quickly as they were realized, as the strong grip of Jim Crow choked communities throughout the South.

Over the violent decades that followed, African Americans endured church bombings,harassment, and police beatings and animal attacks, like the brutalities inflicted on those marching across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 1965. This sacrifice of the black body, along with sustained lobbying, ultimately led to the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Yet even today, second-class citizenship continues. It shows up in generational poverty, a disparate education system, mass incarceration, and violence at the hands of police.

In fact, African Americans are three times as likely as whites to be killed by police, even though they’re twice as likely to be unarmed. That’s produced a slew of names that, like Dred Scott’s, may loom over our history for centuries because of the rights they were denied.

In 2012, Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis, both of whom had committed no crimes or infractions of any sort, were deprived of their constitutional right to life by self-deputized racists who proclaimed themselves judge, juror, and executioner and gunned them down.

That same year, Rekia Boyd was murdered under a hail of bullets by an off-duty police officer who reproached Boyd and her friends for talking too loudly, depriving her of her right to free speech, freedom of assembly, and life.

In August 2014, Michael Brown’s right to a fair and public trial was violated by the police officer who shot him and callously left his lifeless body to bleed out in the street.

Walter Scott’s life and right to due process were taken in April 2015 at the hands of a law enforcement officer, who then had the audacity to plant his weapon next to Scott’s motionless body on the ground — all over a mere traffic violation.

On July 5, 2016, Alton Sterling, a father of five who was selling CDs to provide for his children, was murdered by law enforcement officers who violated his Fourth Amendment right to prevent unwarranted search and seizure simply because he fit a certain profile.

Less than 48 hours later, Philando Castile was pulled over for a broken tail light. Castile’s non-threatening disclosure that he was legally carrying a concealed weapon prompted a police officer to murder him in front of his partner and her four-year-old daughter, violating his Second Amendment right to bear arms.

In 2016, one would hope that the “inalienable rights” of all Americans are respected. Yet Taney’s words that African Americans “have no rights which the white man was bound to respect” still ring loud and clear.

Not A Man, Not Human and Not Worthy Of Rights On Protection Under The Law :

Reasons Why You Should Not Complain:

You were savages..

You were not educated.

You lacked spirituality.( I will address these myth in PT.2)

Even though Science and Historians both agree the this is not the facts. Young children of all races rely on the lies and myths of public educational systems to miseducate them about the Black Man’s actual history.

But why?

America has never and will never correct this system and in many ways I feel that it isn’t all bad.

If we take a closer look at this system and the power of a required educational formula we may see that all other ethnic groups through Religion, Family gatherings and National connection educate their posterity to a sense of pride and citizenship.

Where is the “Black State”..?

The “Black Flag “..?

The “Black Language “..?

The “Black Military “..?

Black is a color and this color does not represent all of them because they come in many colors.

In a conversation with a friend the other day, our conversation took a turn when my “Friend “ referred to the “Black People “ as a minority.

I responded by saying to him that if he would connect with his proud Italian community instead of connecting to the “White Race” He/They would also be considered a minority.

Hmm…

E Pluribus Unum

Out Of Many One.

One America,One People?

Hmm…

A Brief History of Slavery and the Origins of American Policing

Written by Victor E. Kappeler, Ph.D.

The birth and development of the American police can be traced to a multitude of historical, legal and political-economic conditions. The institution of slavery and the control of minorities, however, were two of the more formidable historic features of American society shaping early policing. Slave patrols and Night Watches, which later became modern police departments, were both designed to control the behaviors of minorities. For example, New England settlers appointed Indian Constables to police Native Americans (National Constable Association, 1995), the St. Louis police were founded to protect residents from Native Americans in that frontier city, and many southern police departments began as slave patrols. In 1704, the colony of Carolina developed the nation’s first slave patrol. Slave patrols helped to maintain the economic order and to assist the wealthy landowners in recovering and punishing slaves who essentially were considered property.

Policing was not the only social institution enmeshed in slavery. Slavery was fully institutionalized in the American economic and legal order with laws being enacted at both the state and national divisions of government. Virginia, for example, enacted more than 130 slave statutes between 1689 and 1865. Slavery and the abuse of people of color, however, was not merely a southern affair as many have been taught to believe. Connecticut, New York and other colonies enacted laws to criminalize and control slaves. Congress also passed fugitive Slave Laws, laws allowing the detention and return of escaped slaves, in 1793 and 1850. As Turner, Giacopassi and Vandiver (2006:186) remark, “the literature clearly establishes that a legally sanctioned law enforcement system existed in America before the Civil War for the express purpose of controlling the slave population and protecting the interests of slave owners. The similarities between the slave patrols and modern American policing are too salient to dismiss or ignore. Hence, the slave patrol should be considered a forerunner of modern American law enforcement.”

The legacy of slavery and racism did not end after the Civil War. In fact it can be argued that extreme violence against people of color became even worse with the rise of vigilante groups who resisted Reconstruction. Because vigilantes, by definition, have no external restraints, lynch mobs had a justified reputation for hanging minorities first and asking questions later. Because of its tradition of slavery, which rested on the racist rationalization that Blacks were sub-human, America had a long and shameful history of mistreating people of color, long after the end of the Civil War. Perhaps the most infamous American vigilante group, the Ku Klux Klan started in the 1860s, was notorious for assaulting and lynching Black men for transgressions that would not be considered crimes at all, had a White man committed them. Lynching occurred across the entire county not just in the South. Finally, in 1871 Congress passed the Ku Klux Klan Act, which prohibited state actors from violating the Civil Rights of all citizens in part because of law enforcements’ involvement with the infamous group. This legislation, however, did not stem the tide of racial or ethnic abuse that persisted well into the 1960s.

Though having white skin did not prevent discrimination in America, being White undoubtedly made it easier for ethnic minorities to assimilate into the mainstream of America. The additional burden of racism has made that transition much more difficult for those whose skin is black, brown, red, or yellow. In no small part because of the tradition of slavery, Blacks have long been targets of abuse. The use of patrols to capture runaway slaves was one of the precursors of formal police forces, especially in the South. This disastrous legacy persisted as an element of the police role even after the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In some cases, police harassment simply meant people of African descent were more likely to be stopped and questioned by the police, while at the other extreme, they have suffered beatings, and even murder, at the hands of White police. Questions still arise today about the disproportionately high numbers of people of African descent killed, beaten, and arrested by police in major urban cities of America.

Victor E. Kappeler, Ph.D.

Associate Dean and Foundation Professor

School of Justice Studies

Eastern Kentucky University

pisonline.eju.edu

References

National Constables Association (1995). Constable. In W. G. Bailey (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Police Science (2nd ed., pp. 114–114). New York, NY: Garland Press.

Turner, K. B. , Giacopassi , D. , & Vandiver , M. (2006) . Ignoring the Past: Coverage of Slavery and Slave Patrols in Criminal Justice Texts. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 17: (1), 181–195.

Published on January 07, 2014

This is part 1 of a 3 part series that is designed to get clarity, understanding and answers.

I have had many people tug at me and asking me to offer my thoughts and ideas on this difficult subject as well as offer anecdotes to help us correct many of the misconceptions and misunderstandings that divide us so let’s face it together.- Arnoldmrdadtate-

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